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The Foundation:

  • Supports systemic change through policy reform initiatives, including legislative and administrative action
  • Partners with strategic thinkers to support programs and policies designed to put youth on a successful path toward a sustainable future
  • Collaborates with other funders to engage and build meaningful partnerships
  • Leverages the unique and independent role of philanthropy to provide nimble funding for creative, strategic and timely solutions
  • Supports organizational improvements across infrastructure, communications, and data collection, and analysis

The Walter S. Johnson Foundation assists transition-aged foster and other vulnerable youth in Northern California and Nevada, to become successful adults.

  • Fewer than one third of students that start at a California community college complete their educational goals, such as transfer to a four-year school, or completion of an associate’s degree or a career technical certificate. Less than 3% of former foster youth received a bachelor degree. WSJF works with post-secondary institutions, primarily community colleges, to address barriers to completion at the systems and classroom level, as well as success career and employment training programs addressing the needs of vulnerable students.

    Types of activities supported

    • Programs that address the needs of vulnerable students with the ability to succeed in post secondary educational settings
    • Programs that improve employment career pathways for vulnerable young people
    • Programs that improve general education to create better pathways towards transfer
    • Research and policy work to evaluate and support these kinds of activities
  • Fewer than one third of students that start at a California community college complete their educational goals, such as transfer to a four-year school, or completion of an associate’s degree or a career technical certificate. Less than 3% of former foster youth received a bachelor degree. WSJF works with post-secondary institutions, primarily community colleges, to address barriers to completion at the systems and classroom level, as well as success career and employment training programs addressing the needs of vulnerable students.

    Types of activities supported

    • Programs that address the needs of vulnerable students with the ability to succeed in post secondary educational settings
    • Programs that improve employment career pathways for vulnerable young people
    • Programs that improve general education to create better pathways towards transfer
    • Research and policy work to evaluate and support these kinds of activities
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California College Pathways

In California every year, about 4,000 18 year-olds emancipate from foster care and find themselves on their own. Without adequate social support or life skills, many become homeless, out of work or incarcerated.

College is out of reach for most of these youth. Only 19% of the 19 year-olds who are former foster youth enroll in college compared with 62% of 19 year-olds nationally. Less than 2% of former foster youth complete a bachelor’s degree, compared with 24% of the general population. In California, 55% of former foster youth attend community college, but only 60% of those earn any college credit and only 14% earn more than 30 credits. Less than 2% of former foster youth in California complete a bachelor’s degree.

The problem begins with former foster youth’s lack of college readiness (one-third receive neither a high school diploma nor a GED, as compared with 10 percent in the general population). But even college-ready foster youth still lack the housing, counseling and financial aid they need to persist in college.

California College Pathways, currently in place at 31 colleges, universities, and technical schools in Orange County and the Bay Area, provides former foster youth with year-round housing, financial aid, counseling, and academic tutoring and support.

In the past two years, there has been growing interest from institutions of higher education in starting college support programs for former foster youth, due to the efforts of private foundations and higher education to expand college access for former foster youth, and new federal grant money to help former foster youth meet their vocational and higher education goals.

In response, the Stuart and Walter S Johnson foundations have joined with California State University, California Community Colleges and the John Burton Foundation to expand California College Pathways programs.

California College Pathways programs use these support strategies:

  • Priority for campus housing, and availability of year-round housing, either on- or off-campus.
  • Assistance with finding a stable and skilled college mentor or coach who can help develop and monitor an education plan and tutoring to support students’ academic progress.
  • Financial aid
  • Access to student support services (such as mental health services, the Federal TRIO program, and the Educational Opportunity Program);
  • Frequent monitoring of student academic progress and follow-up advising to ensure student access to academic support services;
  • Active involvement in first-year orientation, college culture, summer bridge programs, and first-year experiences;
  • Student outcome data collection, including data on persistence and graduation rates and internal/external services accessed;
  • A formal relationship with local social services and Independent Living Programs to ensure that students receive the full range of supportive services;
  • Linkages between two- and four-year schools to facilitate student transfer;
  • A long-term plan to sustain the program itself.

For more information, please visit the California College Pathways website.

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Hack Foster Care

In California every year, about 4,000 18 year-olds emancipate from foster care and find themselves on their own. Without adequate social support or life skills, many become homeless, out of work or incarcerated.

College is out of reach for most of these youth. Only 19% of the 19 year-olds who are former foster youth enroll in college compared with 62% of 19 year-olds nationally. Less than 2% of former foster youth complete a bachelor’s degree, compared with 24% of the general population. In California, 55% of former foster youth attend community college, but only 60% of those earn any college credit and only 14% earn more than 30 credits. Less than 2% of former foster youth in California complete a bachelor’s degree.

The problem begins with former foster youth’s lack of college readiness (one-third receive neither a high school diploma nor a GED, as compared with 10 percent in the general population). But even college-ready foster youth still lack the housing, counseling and financial aid they need to persist in college.

California College Pathways, currently in place at 31 colleges, universities, and technical schools in Orange County and the Bay Area, provides former foster youth with year-round housing, financial aid, counseling, and academic tutoring and support.

In the past two years, there has been growing interest from institutions of higher education in starting college support programs for former foster youth, due to the efforts of private foundations and higher education to expand college access for former foster youth, and new federal grant money to help former foster youth meet their vocational and higher education goals.

In response, the Stuart and Walter S Johnson foundations have joined with California State University, California Community Colleges and the John Burton Foundation to expand California College Pathways programs.

California College Pathways programs use these support strategies:

  • Priority for campus housing, and availability of year-round housing, either on- or off-campus.
  • Assistance with finding a stable and skilled college mentor or coach who can help develop and monitor an education plan and tutoring to support students’ academic progress.
  • Financial aid
  • Access to student support services (such as mental health services, the Federal TRIO program, and the Educational Opportunity Program);
  • Frequent monitoring of student academic progress and follow-up advising to ensure student access to academic support services;
  • Active involvement in first-year orientation, college culture, summer bridge programs, and first-year experiences;
  • Student outcome data collection, including data on persistence and graduation rates and internal/external services accessed;
  • A formal relationship with local social services and Independent Living Programs to ensure that students receive the full range of supportive services;
  • Linkages between two- and four-year schools to facilitate student transfer;
  • A long-term plan to sustain the program itself.

For more information, please visit the California College Pathways website.

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Hire A Foster Youth

In California every year, about 4,000 18 year-olds emancipate from foster care and find themselves on their own. Without adequate social support or life skills, many become homeless, out of work or incarcerated.

College is out of reach for most of these youth. Only 19% of the 19 year-olds who are former foster youth enroll in college compared with 62% of 19 year-olds nationally. Less than 2% of former foster youth complete a bachelor’s degree, compared with 24% of the general population. In California, 55% of former foster youth attend community college, but only 60% of those earn any college credit and only 14% earn more than 30 credits. Less than 2% of former foster youth in California complete a bachelor’s degree.

The problem begins with former foster youth’s lack of college readiness (one-third receive neither a high school diploma nor a GED, as compared with 10 percent in the general population). But even college-ready foster youth still lack the housing, counseling and financial aid they need to persist in college.

California College Pathways, currently in place at 31 colleges, universities, and technical schools in Orange County and the Bay Area, provides former foster youth with year-round housing, financial aid, counseling, and academic tutoring and support.

In the past two years, there has been growing interest from institutions of higher education in starting college support programs for former foster youth, due to the efforts of private foundations and higher education to expand college access for former foster youth, and new federal grant money to help former foster youth meet their vocational and higher education goals.

In response, the Stuart and Walter S Johnson foundations have joined with California State University, California Community Colleges and the John Burton Foundation to expand California College Pathways programs.

California College Pathways programs use these support strategies:

  • Priority for campus housing, and availability of year-round housing, either on- or off-campus.
  • Assistance with finding a stable and skilled college mentor or coach who can help develop and monitor an education plan and tutoring to support students’ academic progress.
  • Financial aid
  • Access to student support services (such as mental health services, the Federal TRIO program, and the Educational Opportunity Program);
  • Frequent monitoring of student academic progress and follow-up advising to ensure student access to academic support services;
  • Active involvement in first-year orientation, college culture, summer bridge programs, and first-year experiences;
  • Student outcome data collection, including data on persistence and graduation rates and internal/external services accessed;
  • A formal relationship with local social services and Independent Living Programs to ensure that students receive the full range of supportive services;
  • Linkages between two- and four-year schools to facilitate student transfer;
  • A long-term plan to sustain the program itself.

For more information, please visit the California College Pathways website.

Areas Served

Northern California Counties

Alameda, Alpine, Amador, Butte, Calaveras, Colusa, Contra Costa, Del Norte, El Dorado, Fresno, Glenn, Humboldt, Inyo, Kings, Lake, Lassen, Madera, Marin, Mariposa, Mendocino, Merced, Modoc, Mono, Monterey, Napa, Nevada, Placer, Plumas, Sacramento, San Benito, San Francisco,San Joaquin, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, Shasta, Sierra, Siskiyou, Solano, Sonoma, Stanislaus, Sutter, Tehama, Trinity, Tulare, Tuolumne, Yolo, Yuba

Nevada

As of February 2018, all counties in Nevada are eligible for WSJF grant funding (prior to this date, only agencies serving Washoe county are eligible for funding).

Areas Served

Board of Trustees

Nate Brucker

Trustee

- Chair, Grants Committee
- Member, Technology Committee

Jessica Johnson

Trustee

- Member, Grants Committee
- Member, Audit Committee
- Member, Technology Committee

Kristin A. Johnson

Trustee & Treasurer

- Member, Investments Committee

Peter Lillevand

Trustee

- Chair, Investments Committee
- Chair, Audit Committee

Martin Sullivan

Trustee

- Chair, Technology Committee
- Member, Audit Committee
- Member, Nominations Committee

Kaitlyn Tamulonis

Trustee & Secretary

- Member, Grants Committee

Hathily Winston

Trustee & President

- Chair, Nominations Committee
- Member, Investments Committee

Sandy Bruckner

Vice President

Admin

Audit

Audit

A pdf link to our Audited financial statements are in this section.  If you have any other financial questions not addressed in these audits please contact us directly.  2004 | 2005 | 2009 | 2010 | 2011 | 2012 | 2013 | 2014

Logos

Logos

If you need our logos in a digital format then you are in the right place.  The Walter S. Johnson Foundation logos should not be modified in any way and if you are confused about usage please contact us for clarification.

Heritage

Walter S. Johnson

Walter S. Johnson was born in East Saginaw, Michigan in 1884. He moved West while still a youngster, ultimately settling in San Francisco, and graduated from the University of California law school in 1914. After working briefly as an attorney and serving in World War I, Mr. Johnson became a partner in, and later the president of, Tarter, Webster & Johnson, a wholesale lumber firm.

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Walter S. Johnson

Walter S. Johnson was born in East Saginaw, Michigan in 1884. He moved West while still a youngster, ultimately settling in San Francisco, and graduated from the University of California law school in 1914. After working briefly as an attorney and serving in World War I, Mr. Johnson became a partner in, and later the president of, Tarter, Webster & Johnson, a wholesale lumber firm. In 1927, he founded the American Box Corporation, which later became the American Forest Products Corporation, and served as its president for more than forty years.

Walter Johnson Tractor

Mr Johnson also helped create Friden Calculating Machine Company in 1933 and was elected president in 1945 on the death of its founder. He remained active in the management of both companies until well into his eighties. Mr. Johnson died in 1978.

Walter Johnson received considerable public notice in 1959 with his lead gift to the city of San Francisco for the reconstruction of the Palace of Fine Arts. The building, designed by Bernard Maybeck and originally constructed in 1915 for the Panama-Pacific Exposition, had captured Mr. Johnson’s fancy when he visited the Exposition as a young man. The Palace remained an enduring interest throughout his life.

Mr. Johnson gave to many San Francisco institutions and served on many nonprofit boards. As an ongoing legacy, the Foundation continues to make general support grants to many of the same organizations that Mr. Johnson supported during his lifetime.

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Who are our Grantees?

  • Education and Career Training

    • Educational Results Partnership, $200,000 for 2 years (GR19-12Y) - Support for a qualitative study of the foster youth data landscape in California’s educational system.
    • Nevada System of Higher Education, $200,000 (GR19-02R) - Support to (1) implement a tuition and fee waiver for current and former foster youth and (2) develop strategies to leverage federal Workforce Innovation and Opportunities Act (WIOA) funds to support career pathways for youth in Nevada.
    • SchoolHouse Connections, $200,000 for 2 years (GR19-33Y) - Support for their advocacy to improve secondary and post-secondary educational outcomes for homeless youth, many of whom are former foster youth, in California, and Nevada.

  • 2018

  • 2017

  • 2016

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What Reporting is Necessary?

Interim Reports

Multi-year grantees must submit interim reports for every year of the grant life-cycle, and a final report at the end of the grant cycle. Interim reports are due three months prior to the yearly anniversary. Reporting dates will be included in the grant contract. In addition to the narrative report, please submit an update on accomplishments to date on the current year’s accountability plan and a revised accountability plan for the upcoming grant year.

Single-year grantees who are considering applying for renewal funding should contact program staff six months prior to the end of the present grant-term. If invited to re-apply, a report on progress toward the present grant year’s goals, objectives, accountability plan, and spending should be submitted with the new proposal application.

Final Reports

All grantees are required to submit final reports, which are due two months after the end of the grant period, unless otherwise specified. For multi-year grants, the final report is a cumulative, comprehensive examination of the entire grant term.

Please note that the Foundation typically provides no more than two or three years of consecutive funding.

Since all reports have been revised recently, grantees should contact Charles “Chuck” Hoblitzelle, Grants Manager for current forms and instructions. chuckhoblitzelle(at)wsjf.org

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How do I apply for a Grant?

Step 1) Determine your eligibility

We support organizations whose work qualifies as charitable, according to the IRS definition. This includes organizations with a 501(c) 3 status, public agencies, and projects sponsored by public charities. Only organizations serving the WSJF’s targeted regions of Northern California and Nevada are eligible for grants. We do not make grants to individuals, towards arts or film projects, or contribute to capital campaigns. We do not make grants to international organizations. For county chapters of state organizations, proposal invitations are generally only offered to the state organization.

Step 2)  Determine your project’s fit

Review our funding priorities and list of previous grants to determine whether your efforts advance one or more of the Foundation’s goals and objectives. If you determine that your project/program aligns well with our strategy, please proceed to Step 3. Please review our Funding Priorities .

Step 3) Contact Us

If you have determined that your project is eligible and it is a fit for The WSJF funding priorities, please contact our Program Director: Yali Lincroft to see whether you should submit a proposal. Often, a Letter of Inquiry is requested prior to a full proposal submission. The Walter S. Johnson Foundation does not accept unsolicited proposals.

Step 4) Submit a proposal (by invitation only)

If you have been invited to submit a proposal, a WSJF Program Officer or Grants Manager will send a proposal packet electronically. Please submit your application by the deadline that you have been given (typically several months prior to the board meeting at which your proposal will be considered). The proposal application packet consists of instructions, a checklist of required documents, and the foundation’s expectations with respect to the proposal. When completed, submit proposal and attachments electronically to our Program Director: Yali Lincroft.

Please note, it can take approximately 3 to 6 months for program staff to conduct the necessary due diligence (which may include but not be limited to a site visit, follow-up meetings with key staff, reference checks, and program/financial assessment) to present funding recommendations to our Board of Trustees. During the review process, staff will keep you informed about your proposal’s status.

Step 5) Proposal review and funding determination

Program staff will notify you if and when your proposal will be presented to the Board of Directors and when to expect a decision. The Board meets four times each year to make funding decisions (February, May, July/August, and November). Proposals are generally due 3 months prior to the board meeting.

Please note that the Foundation typically provides no more than two or three years of consecutive funding to its grantees.

Media

    • “Youth homeless and higher education – an overview” (SchoolHouse Connections, Jan 2019)
    • “Food insecurity – better information could help students access federal food assistance benefits” (US Government Accountability Office, Jan 2019)
    • “Lessons in Disaster Recovery from the Napa Valley Wildfires” (VOICES/On The Move, Jan 2019)
    • “Op Ed – School funding ignores growing need of homeless students in rural California” (San Francisco Chronicle, Jan 2019)
    • “Crisis on the Coast – The Bay Coastal Foster Youth and Homeless Student Population” (Pivot Learning, Feb 2019)
    • “Homeless youth handbook – Helping homeless youth understand their legal rights” (Baker McKenzie, Feb 2019)
    • “Roadmap to college” (Opportunity Junction, Feb 2019)
    • “Supporting college transition for homeless youth – Online training for school staff ” (John Burton Advocates for Youth, Feb 2019)
    • “California legislation eases access to financial aid for foster students”(Youth Today, Feb 2019)
    • “Foster youth, careworkers diverge in views of youths’ preparedness for college” (Chapin Hall, March 2019)
    • “Welcome to college career advocacy leadership, Inc.” (Cali website, April 2019)
    • “Child welfare emergency fund” (Children Now, April 2019)
    • “SSi trust – advocacy fact sheet” (Bay Area Legal Aid, April 2019)
    • “Help 33,000 CA foster youth get the technology they need to thrive !” (iFoster, April 2019)
    • “A $22 million plan to connect California foster youth to smart phones” (Chronicle of Social Change, April 2019)
    • “iFoster teams up to provide California foster youth with smart phones” (iFoster blog, April 2019)
    • “California approves free phones, internet for foster youth” (US News and World Report, April 2019)
    • “Foster kids to get free smartphones starting in June” (89.3KPCC, April 2019)
    • “Youth in foster care to get smartphones , internet access in pilot program” (USA Today, April 2019)
    • “California foster youth in extended care have better postsecondary outcomes” (Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, May 2019)
    • “Story of my life” (FosterMore, June 2019)
    • “The California Children’s Trust Initiative: Financing new approaches to achieve child well-being” (California Children’s Trust, July 2019)
    • “Former South Bay foster child pays it forward as family court judge” (The Mercury News, June 2, 2019)
    • “Graduating from college still a struggle for many California foster youth” (EdSource, July 1, 2019)
    • “Understanding trauma to promote healing in child welfare” (California Child Welfare Co Investment Partnership, Summer 2019)
    • “California community colleges work to solve housing for foster youth (EdSource, Sept 12, 2019)
    • “Youth homeless and higher education – an overview” (SchoolHouse Connections, Jan 2019)
    • “Food insecurity – better information could help students access federal food assistance benefits” (US Government Accountability Office, Jan 2019)
    • “Lessons in Disaster Recovery from the Napa Valley Wildfires” (VOICES/On The Move, Jan 2019)
    • “Op Ed – School funding ignores growing need of homeless students in rural California” (San Francisco Chronicle, Jan 2019)
    • “Crisis on the Coast – The Bay Coastal Foster Youth and Homeless Student Population” (Pivot Learning, Feb 2019)
    • “Homeless youth handbook – Helping homeless youth understand their legal rights” (Baker McKenzie, Feb 2019)
    • “Roadmap to college” (Opportunity Junction, Feb 2019)
    • “Supporting college transition for homeless youth – Online training for school staff ” (John Burton Advocates for Youth, Feb 2019)
    • “California legislation eases access to financial aid for foster students”(Youth Today, Feb 2019)
    • “Foster youth, careworkers diverge in views of youths’ preparedness for college” (Chapin Hall, March 2019)
    • “Welcome to college career advocacy leadership, Inc.” (Cali website, April 2019)
    • “Child welfare emergency fund” (Children Now, April 2019)
    • “SSi trust – advocacy fact sheet” (Bay Area Legal Aid, April 2019)
    • “Help 33,000 CA foster youth get the technology they need to thrive !” (iFoster, April 2019)
    • “A $22 million plan to connect California foster youth to smart phones” (Chronicle of Social Change, April 2019)
    • “iFoster teams up to provide California foster youth with smart phones” (iFoster blog, April 2019)
    • “California approves free phones, internet for foster youth” (US News and World Report, April 2019)
    • “Foster kids to get free smartphones starting in June” (89.3KPCC, April 2019)
    • “Youth in foster care to get smartphones , internet access in pilot program” (USA Today, April 2019)
    • “California foster youth in extended care have better postsecondary outcomes” (Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, May 2019)
    • “Story of my life” (FosterMore, June 2019)
    • “The California Children’s Trust Initiative: Financing new approaches to achieve child well-being” (California Children’s Trust, July 2019)
    • “Former South Bay foster child pays it forward as family court judge” (The Mercury News, June 2, 2019)
    • “Graduating from college still a struggle for many California foster youth” (EdSource, July 1, 2019)
    • “Understanding trauma to promote healing in child welfare” (California Child Welfare Co Investment Partnership, Summer 2019)
    • “California community colleges work to solve housing for foster youth (EdSource, Sept 12, 2019)
    • “Youth homeless and higher education – an overview” (SchoolHouse Connections, Jan 2019)
    • “Food insecurity – better information could help students access federal food assistance benefits” (US Government Accountability Office, Jan 2019)
    • “Lessons in Disaster Recovery from the Napa Valley Wildfires” (VOICES/On The Move, Jan 2019)
    • “Op Ed – School funding ignores growing need of homeless students in rural California” (San Francisco Chronicle, Jan 2019)
    • “Crisis on the Coast – The Bay Coastal Foster Youth and Homeless Student Population” (Pivot Learning, Feb 2019)
    • “Homeless youth handbook – Helping homeless youth understand their legal rights” (Baker McKenzie, Feb 2019)
    • “Roadmap to college” (Opportunity Junction, Feb 2019)
    • “Supporting college transition for homeless youth – Online training for school staff ” (John Burton Advocates for Youth, Feb 2019)
    • “California legislation eases access to financial aid for foster students”(Youth Today, Feb 2019)
    • “Foster youth, careworkers diverge in views of youths’ preparedness for college” (Chapin Hall, March 2019)
    • “Welcome to college career advocacy leadership, Inc.” (Cali website, April 2019)
    • “Child welfare emergency fund” (Children Now, April 2019)
    • “SSi trust – advocacy fact sheet” (Bay Area Legal Aid, April 2019)
    • “Help 33,000 CA foster youth get the technology they need to thrive !” (iFoster, April 2019)
    • “A $22 million plan to connect California foster youth to smart phones” (Chronicle of Social Change, April 2019)
    • “iFoster teams up to provide California foster youth with smart phones” (iFoster blog, April 2019)
    • “California approves free phones, internet for foster youth” (US News and World Report, April 2019)
    • “Foster kids to get free smartphones starting in June” (89.3KPCC, April 2019)
    • “Youth in foster care to get smartphones , internet access in pilot program” (USA Today, April 2019)
    • “California foster youth in extended care have better postsecondary outcomes” (Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, May 2019)
    • “Story of my life” (FosterMore, June 2019)
    • “The California Children’s Trust Initiative: Financing new approaches to achieve child well-being” (California Children’s Trust, July 2019)
    • “Former South Bay foster child pays it forward as family court judge” (The Mercury News, June 2, 2019)
    • “Graduating from college still a struggle for many California foster youth” (EdSource, July 1, 2019)
    • “Understanding trauma to promote healing in child welfare” (California Child Welfare Co Investment Partnership, Summer 2019)
    • “California community colleges work to solve housing for foster youth (EdSource, Sept 12, 2019)
    • “Youth homeless and higher education – an overview” (SchoolHouse Connections, Jan 2019)
    • “Food insecurity – better information could help students access federal food assistance benefits” (US Government Accountability Office, Jan 2019)
    • “Lessons in Disaster Recovery from the Napa Valley Wildfires” (VOICES/On The Move, Jan 2019)
    • “Op Ed – School funding ignores growing need of homeless students in rural California” (San Francisco Chronicle, Jan 2019)
    • “Crisis on the Coast – The Bay Coastal Foster Youth and Homeless Student Population” (Pivot Learning, Feb 2019)
    • “Homeless youth handbook – Helping homeless youth understand their legal rights” (Baker McKenzie, Feb 2019)
    • “Roadmap to college” (Opportunity Junction, Feb 2019)
    • “Supporting college transition for homeless youth – Online training for school staff ” (John Burton Advocates for Youth, Feb 2019)
    • “California legislation eases access to financial aid for foster students”(Youth Today, Feb 2019)
    • “Foster youth, careworkers diverge in views of youths’ preparedness for college” (Chapin Hall, March 2019)
    • “Welcome to college career advocacy leadership, Inc.” (Cali website, April 2019)
    • “Child welfare emergency fund” (Children Now, April 2019)
    • “SSi trust – advocacy fact sheet” (Bay Area Legal Aid, April 2019)
    • “Help 33,000 CA foster youth get the technology they need to thrive !” (iFoster, April 2019)
    • “A $22 million plan to connect California foster youth to smart phones” (Chronicle of Social Change, April 2019)
    • “iFoster teams up to provide California foster youth with smart phones” (iFoster blog, April 2019)
    • “California approves free phones, internet for foster youth” (US News and World Report, April 2019)
    • “Foster kids to get free smartphones starting in June” (89.3KPCC, April 2019)
    • “Youth in foster care to get smartphones , internet access in pilot program” (USA Today, April 2019)
    • “California foster youth in extended care have better postsecondary outcomes” (Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, May 2019)
    • “Story of my life” (FosterMore, June 2019)
    • “The California Children’s Trust Initiative: Financing new approaches to achieve child well-being” (California Children’s Trust, July 2019)
    • “Former South Bay foster child pays it forward as family court judge” (The Mercury News, June 2, 2019)
    • “Graduating from college still a struggle for many California foster youth” (EdSource, July 1, 2019)
    • “Understanding trauma to promote healing in child welfare” (California Child Welfare Co Investment Partnership, Summer 2019)
    • “California community colleges work to solve housing for foster youth (EdSource, Sept 12, 2019)
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Contact

We make every effort to get back to email inquiries in a timely fashion, however due to the large number of emails received, we may be unable to quickly respond directly to your inquiry.  Solicitation requests are not responded to so please avoid emailing us sales requests.  We are located at 505 Montgomery Street, Suite 1200 | San Francisco, CA 94111-6529. To reach us via phone please call 415-283-1854.  Our fax number is 415-283-1840