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The Foundation:

  • Supports systemic change through policy reform initiatives, including legislative and administrative action
  • Partners with strategic thinkers to support programs and policies designed to put youth on a successful path toward a sustainable future
  • Collaborates with other funders to engage and build meaningful partnerships
  • Leverages the unique and independent role of philanthropy to provide nimble funding for creative, strategic and timely solutions
  • Supports organizational improvements across infrastructure, communications, and data collection, and analysis

The Walter S. Johnson Foundation assists transition-aged foster and other vulnerable youth in Northern California and Nevada, to become successful adults.

  • Fewer than one third of students that start at a California community college complete their educational goals, such as transfer to a four-year school, or completion of an associate’s degree or a career technical certificate. Less than 3% of former foster youth received a bachelor degree. WSJF works with post-secondary institutions, primarily community colleges, to address barriers to completion at the systems and classroom level, as well as success career and employment training programs addressing the needs of vulnerable students.

    Types of activities supported

    • Programs that address the needs of vulnerable students with the ability to succeed in post secondary educational settings
    • Programs that improve employment career pathways for vulnerable young people
    • Programs that improve general education to create better pathways towards transfer
    • Research and policy work to evaluate and support these kinds of activities
  • Fewer than one third of students that start at a California community college complete their educational goals, such as transfer to a four-year school, or completion of an associate’s degree or a career technical certificate. Less than 3% of former foster youth received a bachelor degree. WSJF works with post-secondary institutions, primarily community colleges, to address barriers to completion at the systems and classroom level, as well as success career and employment training programs addressing the needs of vulnerable students.

    Types of activities supported

    • Programs that address the needs of vulnerable students with the ability to succeed in post secondary educational settings
    • Programs that improve employment career pathways for vulnerable young people
    • Programs that improve general education to create better pathways towards transfer
    • Research and policy work to evaluate and support these kinds of activities

Our Initiatives

California College Pathways

California College Pathways

Campus support programs for former foster youth. Every year, about 4,000 18 year-olds emancipate from foster care in California and find themselves on their own. Without adequate social support or life skills, many find themselves homeless, out of work or incarcerated.

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California College Pathways

In California every year, about 4,000 18 year-olds emancipate from foster care and find themselves on their own. Without adequate social support or life skills, many become homeless, out of work or incarcerated.

College is out of reach for most of these youth. Only 19% of the 19 year-olds who are former foster youth enroll in college compared with 62% of 19 year-olds nationally. Less than 2% of former foster youth complete a bachelor’s degree, compared with 24% of the general population. In California, 55% of former foster youth attend community college, but only 60% of those earn any college credit and only 14% earn more than 30 credits. Less than 2% of former foster youth in California complete a bachelor’s degree.

The problem begins with former foster youth’s lack of college readiness (one-third receive neither a high school diploma nor a GED, as compared with 10 percent in the general population). But even college-ready foster youth still lack the housing, counseling and financial aid they need to persist in college.

California College Pathways, currently in place at 31 colleges, universities, and technical schools in Orange County and the Bay Area, provides former foster youth with year-round housing, financial aid, counseling, and academic tutoring and support.

In the past two years, there has been growing interest from institutions of higher education in starting college support programs for former foster youth, due to the efforts of private foundations and higher education to expand college access for former foster youth, and new federal grant money to help former foster youth meet their vocational and higher education goals.

In response, the Stuart and Walter S Johnson foundations have joined with California State University, California Community Colleges and the John Burton Foundation to expand California College Pathways programs.

California College Pathways programs use these support strategies:

  • Priority for campus housing, and availability of year-round housing, either on- or off-campus.
  • Assistance with finding a stable and skilled college mentor or coach who can help develop and monitor an education plan and tutoring to support students’ academic progress.
  • Financial aid
  • Access to student support services (such as mental health services, the Federal TRIO program, and the Educational Opportunity Program);
  • Frequent monitoring of student academic progress and follow-up advising to ensure student access to academic support services;
  • Active involvement in first-year orientation, college culture, summer bridge programs, and first-year experiences;
  • Student outcome data collection, including data on persistence and graduation rates and internal/external services accessed;
  • A formal relationship with local social services and Independent Living Programs to ensure that students receive the full range of supportive services;
  • Linkages between two- and four-year schools to facilitate student transfer;
  • A long-term plan to sustain the program itself.

For more information, please visit the California College Pathways website.

Hack Foster Care

Hack Foster Care

Hack Foster Care is a cross-sector movement to better leverage technology to improve the Child Welfare System and the lives of foster youth.

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Hack Foster Care

Research released on May 26, 2016 reveals a marked digital divide for foster youth. Led by the Walter S. Johnson Foundation and Foster Care Counts, a public/private coalition has been created to address this digital divide in California.

This collaboration is focused on both micro and macros solutions, including:

  • ACCESS – Providing opportunity gateway for all youth in foster care such as laptops and other productivity devices, including internet access. See video, “One Laptop Per Foster Youth.”
  • EMPLOYMENT AND EDUCATION – Helping youth in foster care have STEM training and career exposure to jobs in technology.
  • APPLICATIONS – Creating tools that improve connections to resources and support networks that educate and improve productivity for caseworkers, caregivers and youth, such as a digital locker for youth to store vital information and records.
  • DATA MANAGEMENT – collecting and using data to improve child welfare services and outcomes for children, youth, and families.

For more information, please visit the hackfostercare.org website.

Hire A Foster Youth

Hire A Foster Youth

Youth in foster care have boundless potential to grow the nation’s economy. With the right training and support, the strength and resilience that has helped them overcome life challenges also instills the persistence and drive to succeed on the job.

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Hire A Foster Youth

More and more smart employers are committing to a double bottom line: profitably growing their businesses while providing foster youth pathways to life success through employment. And with the largest labor gap for the next generation of work-ready employees ever facing this country, a commitment to hiring talented young people is all the more urgent.

Youth in foster care have boundless potential to grow the nation’s economy. With the right training and support, the strength and resilience that has helped them overcome life challenges also instills the persistence and drive to succeed on the job.

By bringing together businesses, non-profit organizations, government agencies, and philanthropy, the goal of the Hireafosteryouth.org campaign is to:

  • Ensure a level playing field so that foster youth have the same employment opportunities as their non-foster youth counterparts;
  • Share foster youth-focused work-readiness assessments, job training curricula, and other resources with youth-serving organizations;
  • Connect the nation’s leading employers and small businesses with work-ready foster youth;
  • Provide innovative approaches to internships and mentorships for foster youth;
  • Promote best practices for supporting foster youth as they transition into employment and self-sufficiency; and
  • Educate the business community, the public, and the media about the value and potential of the nation’s foster youth.

For more information, go to hireafosteryouth.org

Areas Served

Northern California Counties

Alameda, Alpine, Amador, Butte, Calaveras, Colusa, Contra Costa, Del Norte, El Dorado, Fresno, Glenn, Humboldt, Inyo, Kings, Lake, Lassen, Madera, Marin, Mariposa, Mendocino, Merced, Modoc, Mono, Monterey, Napa, Nevada, Placer, Plumas, Sacramento, San Benito, San Francisco,San Joaquin, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, Shasta, Sierra, Siskiyou, Solano, Sonoma, Stanislaus, Sutter, Tehama, Trinity, Tulare, Tuolumne, Yolo, Yuba

Nevada

As of February 2018, all counties in Nevada are eligible for WSJF grant funding (prior to this date, only agencies serving Washoe county are eligible for funding).

Areas Served

Board of Trustees

Kaitlyn Tamulonis

Trustee & Secretary

- Member, Grants Committee

Sandy Bruckner

Vice President

Peter Lillevand

Trustee

- Chair, Investments Committee
- Chair, Audit Committee

Jessica Johnson

Trustee

- Chair, Grants Committee
- Member, Audit Committee

Nate Brucker

Trustee & Treasurer

- Member, Technology Committee

Hathily Winston

Trustee & President

- Member, Investments Committee

Katie Hayden

Trustee

- Member, Grants Committee
- Member, Technology Committee
- Member, Nominations Committee

Martin Sullivan

Trustee

- Chair, Nominations Committee
- Chair, Technology Committee
- Member, Investments Committee
- Member, Audit Committee

Staff

Image of Ashley Fontanetta

Ashley Fontanetta

Executive Director
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Ashley Fontanetta


Executive Director

Ashley brings a background in both financial services and nonprofit management. Prior to joining Whittier Trust, Ashley worked as a Financial Advisor, where she was responsible for advising wealth management strategies for her clients and their families. She also spent several years as a director of a nonprofit organization serving chronically-ill youth in Los Angeles and the Bay Area. Ashley earned her Bachelor’s degree in International Relations from the University of Southern California and has completed advanced studies at USC’s School of Social Work and The American College of Financial Services. She remains an active volunteer in the community, working with organizations that focus on homelessness, youth mentorship and education.

Image of Yali Lincroft, MBA

Yali Lincroft, MBA

Program Director
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Yali Lincroft, MBA


Program Director

Yali Lincroft has over 20 years experience in local, state, and federal policy and program planning. She is the winner of the 2018 Bernard Osher Philanthropist of the Year Award from the Foundation of California Community Colleges, the 2013 Obama White House Champion for Change Award, and the 2018 Council on Foundation/HUD Public Private Partnership Award.  Her career includes working with the Annie E. Casey Foundation, the San Francisco Department of Children, Youth, and Family, First Focus and many other government and nonprofit agencies.  Yali helped launch several public/private partnership including the Foster Youth Success Initiative housed at the Nevada System of Higher Education, the California Opportunity Youth Initiative, and the California College Pathways Initiative.  She is on the board of the National Association of Counsel for Children, the Legal Services Funders Network, and the Children's Campaign Fund.  Yali received her MBA with honors from the University of California at Davis. 



Image of Chuck Hoblitzelle

Chuck Hoblitzelle

Grants Manager
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Chuck Hoblitzelle


Grants Manager

Chuck Hoblitzelle manages the Foundation’s grantmaking process. He performs philanthropic due diligence on applicant organizations, reviews grant budgets and financial reports, and maintains our grants database. Chuck has more than 15 years of experience managing nonprofit programs in the U.S., India and Africa. He received a Bachelor of Arts in journalism from San Francisco State University.

Admin

Audit

Audit

A pdf link to our Audited financial statements are in this section.  If you have any other financial questions not addressed in these audits please contact us directly 2004 | 2005 | 2009 | 2010 | 2011 | 2012 | 2013 | 2014 | 20152016201720182019

Logos

Logos

If you need our logos in a digital format then you are in the right place.  The Walter S. Johnson Foundation logos should not be modified in any way and if you are confused about usage please contact us for clarification.

Heritage

Walter S. Johnson

Walter S. Johnson was born in East Saginaw, Michigan in 1884. He moved West while still a youngster, ultimately settling in San Francisco, and graduated from the University of California law school in 1914. After working briefly as an attorney and serving in World War I, Mr. Johnson became a partner in, and later the president of, Tarter, Webster & Johnson, a wholesale lumber firm.

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Walter S. Johnson

Walter S. Johnson was born in East Saginaw, Michigan in 1884. He moved West while still a youngster, ultimately settling in San Francisco, and graduated from the University of California law school in 1914. After working briefly as an attorney and serving in World War I, Mr. Johnson became a partner in, and later the president of, Tarter, Webster & Johnson, a wholesale lumber firm. In 1927, he founded the American Box Corporation, which later became the American Forest Products Corporation, and served as its president for more than forty years.

Walter Johnson Tractor

Mr Johnson also helped create Friden Calculating Machine Company in 1933 and was elected president in 1945 on the death of its founder. He remained active in the management of both companies until well into his eighties. Mr. Johnson died in 1978.

Walter Johnson received considerable public notice in 1959 with his lead gift to the city of San Francisco for the reconstruction of the Palace of Fine Arts. The building, designed by Bernard Maybeck and originally constructed in 1915 for the Panama-Pacific Exposition, had captured Mr. Johnson’s fancy when he visited the Exposition as a young man. The Palace remained an enduring interest throughout his life.

Mr. Johnson gave to many San Francisco institutions and served on many nonprofit boards. As an ongoing legacy, the Foundation continues to make general support grants to many of the same organizations that Mr. Johnson supported during his lifetime.

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Who are our Grantees?

  • LARGE AND MULTI-YEAR GRANTS
    • Beyond Emancipation, $400,000 for 2 years (GR21-17) - Support to increase the number of foster youth receiving intensive supportive services in Alameda County, CA.
    • California Alliance of Caregivers, $140,000 for 2 years (GR21-01Y) - Support for program and services helping foster and relative caregivers.
    • California Homeless Youth Project (housed at the California Research Bureau) - $100,000 for 1 year (GR21-02R) - Support for the "You Count: California Youth Homelessness Data Project."
    • Child Care Law Center, $140,000 for 2 years (GR21-03Y) - Support for child care policy and legal technical assistance to the California Department of Social Services.
    • Children's Law Center of California, $125,000 for 1 year (GR21-04R) - Support for the CARE enhanced legal assistance to children in the foster care system program for Northern California counties.
    • Hope Solutions (formerly Contra Costa Interfaith, $150,000 for 2 years (GR21-09Y) - Support for education/employment support for homeless transition age youth in Contra Costa County.
    • Legal Aid Center of Southern Nevada, $200,000 for 2 years (GR21-10Y) - Support for education advocacy program for foster youth in Southern Nevada.
    • National Center for Youth Law, $150,000 for 2 years (GR21-11Y) - Support for the Compassionate System Initiative, an educational equity for system involved system in California.
    • New Ways to Work, $400,000 for 2 years (GR21-13Y) - Support for expansion and capacity building of the California Opportunity Youth Network (COYN).
    • Unity Care, $200,000 for 2 years (GR21-12Y) - Support for programs services for transitional age foster youth in Placer, Nevada, El Dorado, and Sacramento counties.

    SPECIAL PROJECTS FUNDS (UNDER $40,000 GRANTS)
    • CalMatters, $10,000 (GR21-20D) - Higher education journalism network.
    • Children's Advocacy Alliance, $10,000 (GR21-21D) - NV foster youth research study.
    • Community Support Network, $30,000 (GR21-19D) - Sanctuary villas and Sanctuary house.
    • iFoster, $20,000 (GR21-15D) - Laptops for college foster youth.
    • PRIDE Industries, $40,000 (GR21-06D) - Evaluation of the at-risk youth employment services project.
    • Youth Forward, $20,000 (GR21-16D) - Connecting foster youth organization to Prop 64 funding resources.
    • LARGE AND MULTI-YEAR GRANTS - 15 grants
      • Alliance for Children's Rights, $200,000 for 2 years (GR20-58D) - Support for their "Hidden Foster Care" project to reform local child welfare practice.
      • California College Pathways - Donor Advised Fund, $200,000 for 1 year (GR20-06R) - Contributing to a pooled fund of grants to support campus programs supporting foster youth scholars throughout Northern California.
      • Children's Advocacy Alliance, $100,000 for 1 year (GR20-60R) - Support for their Nevada Foster Youth Employment Transition Initiative.
      • Center for Law and Social Policy, $200,000 for 2 years (GR20-33Y) - Support for advocacy efforts for policies to support access to food, postsecondary education, and employment stability for foster youth and young people with low income, particularly focused on California and Nevada.
      • Foster Kinship, $200,000 for 2 years (GR20-34Y) - Support to enhance their statewide Nevada Kinship Navigator program.
      • Foundation for California Community Colleges, $500,000 for 3 years (GR20-61Y) - Support for the basic needs centers in the community colleges of the Sacramento Valley region.
      • Lutheran Social Services of Northern California, $300,000 for 2 years (GR20-59Y) - Support for their Youth Education and Employment Initiative.
      • John Burton Advocates for Youth, $400,000 for 2 years (GR20-01Y) - Support for a qualitative study of the foster youth data landscape in California’s educational system.
      • John Burton Advocates for Youth, $100,000 for 1 year (GR20-05R) - Purchase and distribute laptops and cellphones to foster youth scholars in higher education during the COVID crisis.
      • John Burton Advocates for Youth, $200,000 for 2 years (GR20-62Y) - Support for the San Francisco Bay Area Training Age Youth Workforce Initiative.
      • Mockingbird Society, $200,000 for 2 years (GR20-31Y) - Support to recruit and train two new foster parent Mockingbird Family modes in Fresno County.
      • Nevada System of Higher Education, $400,000 for 2 years (GR20-03Y) - Support for the implementation of its statewide Foster Youth Success Initiative (FYSI)
      • University of Nevada, Las Vegas, $200,000 for 2 years (GR20-02Y) - Support to develop a Guardian Scholars Program for former and current foster youth scholars.
      • Together We Rise, $200,000 for 1 year (GR20-30R) - Support for their Rapid Response Program for Foster youth in College, support scholars in Northern California and Nevada.
      • Western Center on Law and Poverty, $200,000 for 2 years (GR20-32Y) - Support for anti-hunger and food security advocacy for legislation and policy related to students, former foster and juvenile justice youth, and families impacted by foster care.

      GRANTS UNDER $40,000 - 31 grants
      • Advokids (GR20-64D) - Support child welfare legal hotline.
      • Alliance for Children's Rights (GR20-35D) - Support for kinship care advocacy and policy reform.
      • Alliance for Strong Families and Communities (GR20-40D) - Support for their pandemic policy planning for health and human services agencies.
      • Alternative Family Services (GR20-25D) - Equipment and staff training in response to COVID-19 pandemic.
      • Alternative Family Services (GR20-37D) - COVID 19 safe visitation assessment and implementation.
      • American Public Human Services Association (GR20-39D) - Support for their pandemic policy planning for health and human services agencies.
      • California Alliance for Caregivers (GR20-14D) - General support for resource family engagement and advocacy.
      • California CASA Association (GR20-20D) - Support services and emergency response to pandemic closure.
      • California Homeless Youth Project - California State Library Foundation (GR20-42D) - Support publication focused on issues facing homeless community college students in California.
      • California Youth Connection (GR20-56D) - General support.
      • CalMatters (GR20-43D) - Support for journalism and webinars focused on higher education for marginalized populations.
      • Child and Family Policy Institute of California (GR20-07D) - Support travel costs for foster youth attendance at TAYCON conference 2020.
      • Children's Partnership (GR20-41D) - Cultivating an ecosystem to support the health and well-being of marginalized youth in California.
      • Children Now (GR20-65D) - Support federal transition planning for children and family services in California.
      • Children's Services Foundation (GR20-38D) - Support the COVID 19 California provide hotline.
      • Community Support Network (GR20-15D) - Start-up and sustainability planning for Sanctuary Villa, youth housing program.
      • Foster Kinship (GR20-08D) - Strategic planning for state expansion.
      • Generations United (GR20-23D) - Support for grandfamilies with resource information during COVID-19 pandemic.
      • iFoster (GR20-19D) - Smart phones for foster youth in higher education.
      • John Muir Land Trust (GR20-63D) - Support for foster youth employment program at the Family Harvest Farm.
      • Juma Ventures (GR20-07R) - General support for employment opportunities for at risk youth in the Sacramento region
      • Legal Services for Funders housed at Northern California Grantmakers (GR20-36D) - Support for post-graduate legal fellows program.
      • Lutheran Social Services of Northern California (GR20-07R) - Support for educational and workforce training programs serving at risk youth in the Sacramento and Stockton region.
      • Peace4Kids (GR20-18D) - Support for former foster youth scholars association.
      • Pivotal (GR20-17D) - Increasing system involved youth access to WIOA employment funding.
      • Root and Rebound (GR20-16D) - Legal advocacy for justice impacted San Francisco Bay Area Youth\
      • Seneca Family of Agencies (GR20-22D) - Operating support for COVID19 response programs.
      • Seneca Family of Agencies (GR20-27D) - Recruitment of foster and resource parents through social media.
      • Volunteers of America - Northern California/Northern Nevada (GR20-57D) - Support for the Dare-to-Dream homeless and foster youth scholarship program.
      • Washoe County Human Services (GR20-26D) - Purchase of laptops for foster youth.
      • Youth Forward (GR20-05D) - Analyze potential benefits of cannabis tax revenues to foster youth organizations.

    • Education and Career Training
      • Educational Results Partnership, $200,000 for 2 years (GR19-12Y) - Support for a qualitative study of the foster youth data landscape in California’s educational system.
      • Nevada System of Higher Education, $200,000 (GR19-02R) - Support to (1) implement a tuition and fee waiver for current and former foster youth and (2) develop strategies to leverage federal Workforce Innovation and Opportunities Act (WIOA) funds to support career pathways for youth in Nevada.
      • SchoolHouse Connections, $200,000 for 2 years (GR19-33Y) - Support for their advocacy to improve secondary and post-secondary educational outcomes for homeless youth, many of whom are former foster youth, in California, and Nevada
    • Large and multi-year grants
      • Beyond Emancipation, $200,000 for 2 years (GR18-02Y) - Support to expand and increase the capacity of their Workforce Pathways Program to serve younger and more youth in Alameda County.
      • California Youth Connection, $200,000 for 2 years (GR18-12Y) - Support to expand their foster youth leadership and advocacy program in the Central Valley.
      • Food Bank of Contra Costa and Solano County, $250,000 for 2 years (GR18-07Y) - Support for their CalFresh policy and planning efforts related to at-risk and foster care youth in Contra Costa and Solano counties.
      • FosterMore/fiscal agent Tides Foundation, $200,000 for 2 years (GR18-05Y) - Support to expand their foster parent recruitment campaign in Northern Californi
      • iFoster, $200,000 for 1 year (GR18-08R) - Support for their 1Laptop program for youth in Northern California and the expansion of their job training program in Washoe County, NV.
      • National Center for Youth Law, $300,000 for 2 year (GR18-01Y) - Support for improving the educational outcomes for foster youth in Contra Costa and Monterey counties.
      • New Doors Venture, $100,000 for 1 year (GR18-03R) - Support to replicate their job training and work experience program in Alameda county.
      • Washoe County Department of Social Services, $220,000 for 2 years (GR18-04Y) - Support for implementation of the “Achievements Unlocked” program – a court, education, and child welfare partnership to improve the educational and employment outcomes for foster youth in Washoe County, NV.
      • Youth Homes, $100,000 for 1 year (GR18-11R) - Support for implementation of an electronic database system for a residential treatment program in Contra Costa County.

      GRANTS UNDER $40,000

      California CASA * California Youth Connection * Child Advocacy Alliance * Child and Family Policy Institute * Child Care Law Center * Community Services Employment Treatment (CSET) * East Bay Children’s Law Office (EBCLO) * Family Builders by Adoption * Family Support Services

    • LARGE AND MULTI-YEAR GRANTS
      • Alliance for Children’s Rights, $250,000 for 2 years (GR17-01Y) - Support for their Fostering Kinship Families Project, focused on ensuring California’s Continuum of Care Reform legislation is implemented to create a kin-first and child-centered system that reduces reliance on group-home care.
      • Binti (fiscal agent Fostering Media Connections), $100,000 for 1 year (GR17-24R) - To install, implement and support an online foster family licensing software solution at child welfare agencies located throughout Northern California.
      • American Bar Association – Center on Children & the Law, $115,000 for 3 years (GR17-06Y) -Support for their technical assistance and training to the Nevada Washoe County Education and Foster Care workgroup, including the development of a ESSA toolkit targeting foster youth/educational issues in Nevada.
      • California Alliance for Caregivers/fiscal agent United Parents for Children, $50,000 for 1 year (GR17-37R) - To develop a statewide resource family/foster parent advocacy organization.
      • California Homeless Youth Advocacy (fiscal agent California State Library Foundation), $200,000 for 2 years (GR17-40Y) -To improve programs and policies addressing post-secondary access and educational outcomes for transition age youth experiencing homelessness in California.
      • Children’s Network of Solano County, $100,000 for 1 year (GR17-23R) - To establish a Youth Leadership Council for Solano County.
      • Children Now, $250,000 for 2 years (GR17-03Y) - Support to coordinate the collective efforts of child welfare advocates in providing feedback to state-level policy makers in the implementation of California’s Continuum of Care Reform efforts.
      • Children’s Partnership, $70,000 for 1 year (GR17-07R) - Support for their Community of Practice for California counties focused on improving electronic information sharing, as well as developing follow up reports from the HackFosterCare events.
      • Civicorps, $100,000 for 1 year (GR17-43R) - To expand support food, childcare, and transportation support for young adults participating in their high school completion and employment program.
      • Fostering Media Connections, $100,000 for 1 year (GR17-21R) - To produce news stories focused on the education and employment of foster youth, and the intersection of technology and child welfare.
      • John Burton Advocates for Youth, $150,000 for 1 year (GR17-02R) - Support for their role as the coordinator and administrator for the California College Pathways Initiative (CCP). The goal of CCP is to support programs and policies to improve post-secondary educational success for foster youth in California.
      • John Burton Advocates for Youth, $280,000 for 2 years (GR17-18Y) - Support to expand California College Pathways (CCP) model to address the needs of homeless youth in post-secondary education, as well as expand CCP to participate in a FASFA completion challenge.
      • Juma Ventures , $150,000 for 2 years (GR17-19Y) - Support to replicate and expand their youth employment training models to two venues in Sacramento, the Golden 1 Center and Paper Murphy’s Park. The Juma program in Sacramento will serve low-income and former/current foster youth.
      • Law Foundation of Silicon Valley, $200,000 for 2 years (GR17-38Y) -To address the issue of foster youth identity theft – both short-term program and long-term policy solutions.
      • Opportunity Junction ,$150,000 for 2 years (GR17-05Y) - Support for partnership with Los Medanos Community College focused on employment and career training program for 18-24 year old students in East Contra Costa county.
      • Sunny Hills Services, $70,000 for 1 year (GR17-20R) - To convert their group home to be licensed to serve commercially sexually exploited youth in the San Francisco Bay Area.
      • Western Center on Law and Poverty, $75,000 for 1 year (GR17-08R) - To provide policy guidance to California policymakers related to children’s issues in health care, public benefits, and entitlements.
      • Youth Radio, $100,000 for 1 year (GR17-22R) - To produce media coverage and interactive content focused on at-risk transition age youth issues.


      GRANTS UNDER $40,000

      Alameda Family Services * Alex Smith Foundation * American Bar Association * Breaking Barriers * Bronco Bench Foundation * Childcare Resources * Children’s Action Campaign * Children’s Network of Solano County * Children Now * Children’s Partnership * Congressional Coalition on Adoption Institute * East Bay Children’s Law Office * Epicenter * Families Now * First Focus * FosterMore * Fostering Media Connection * HandsOn Central California * Hibiscus Children’s Center * John Burton Advocates for Youth * Los Rios Community College Foundation * Mikeroweworks Foundation * New Doors Venture * New Haven Tennis Outreach * National Association of Social Work – New Mexico * NASPA (Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education) * National Foster Youth Action Network * National Youth Employment Coalition * New Doors Venture * New Mexico State University Foundation * OneJustice * One Simple Wish * Paws in Need * Pinellas Education Foundation * Planned Partnerhood Mar Monte * Social Change Partners * StoneBridge School * Tahoe-Pyramid Bikeway * Tri-Valley Haven * Yuba Community College * Western Center on Law and Poverty * Woodland Community College

    • LARGE AND MULTI-YEAR GRANTS

      • Alternative Family Services, $100,00 for 1 year (GR16-25R) - Create a replicable plan and curriculum to recruit and retain Spanish speaking foster and adoptive resource families.
      • American Bar Association, $500,00 for 2 years (GR16-06Y) - Support to conduct an independent evaluation to assess the impact of funding reallocation on the quality of legal representation of children and parents in California’s dependency courts.
      • California Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) Association, $250,00 for 2 years (GR16-01Y) - Support for implementing its 2015-2020 Growth Plan, designed to build the capacity of its statewide network of CASA programs. This grant will target the Central and Northern California regions.
      • California Youth Connections, $250,000 for 1 year (GR16-02R) - Support the implementation of their Strategic Plan, designed to build the capacity of this foster-youth lead advocacy organization. This grant will also support CYC’s participation in California’s Continuum of Care Reform efforts
      • Center for Media Change/dba Hack the Hood, $400,000 for 3 years (GR16-11Y) - Support to research, develop, pilot and replicate a program that integrates with community college system, and increases low income youth (including foster youth) enrollment into entry level information, communications, and technology (ICT) careers.
      • Center for the Study of Social Policy, $400 for 2 years (GR16-12Y) - Support for the development and testing of an app (“Unify”) which helps transition age foster youth build a network of supporters in Santa Clara County.
      • First Place for Youth, $500,000 for 2 years (GR16-07Y) - Support to (1) document the process of trying to secure an Early Periodic Screening, Diagnostic, and Treatment (EPSDT) contract in Alameda, Contra Costa, or Santa Clara counties, and (2) to operationalize screening and assessment for foster youth in Alameda County.
      • iFoster, $300,000 for one year (GR16-22R) - Implement phase one of the 1Laptop Campaign to provide all transition-age foster youth with a laptop and support the expansion of the iFoster Jobs Program to Sacramento County, CA and Washoe County, Nevada.
      • Law Foundation of Silicon Valley, $100,000 for 1 year (GR16-08R) - Support for its Legal Advocate for Youth and Children program to enable the development of a foster youth identity theft program and toolkit. The Toolkit will be developed in partnership with Bay Area Legal Aid (BALA).
      • Silicon Valley Children’s Fund, $250,000 for one year (GR16-23R) - Coordinate and provide the media/communications effort for the Silicon Valley HackFosterCare Campaign, as well as evaluate the 1Laptop Campaign.
      • TeenForce, $250,000 for 2 years (GR16-24Y) - Support the expansion of their employment and STEM training program for foster youth in Santa Clara county.
      • United Way of the Bay Area, $100,000 for 1 year (GR16-09R) - Support to expand the Guardian Scholars Program at Skyline College to improve outcomes for foster and juvenile justice-involved youth in San Mateo County. A small portion of this grant would also be used for exploring the potential of expanding the Guardian Scholar program to Contra Costa County.
      • University of Chicago, $120,000 for 1 year (GR16-13R) - Support to complete the 5th and final year of the California Youth Transitions to Adulthood (CalYOUTH) Study
      • Youth Radio, $75,000 for 1 year (GR16-03R) - Support for its Digital Communications Pathways program, which engages youth in media and technology art training in the San Francisco Bay Area counties.

      GRANTS UNDER $40,000

      Alameda County Social Services Agency * Alex Smith Foundation * Ainsley’s Angels * Bay Area Legal Aid * Breaking Barriers * Bronco Bench Foundation * California State Library Foundation * California State University Fresno * California Youth Connections * Center for Fostering Success * Center for the Study of Social Policy * Childcare Resources * ChildFocus * Children Now * Children’s Partnership * Coastal Virginia Aquatics * Community Works West * Conservation Earth/dba Wildlife Association * Family Builders by Adoption * First Focus * Foster Youth Alliance * Foster Youth Education Fund * Fostering Media Connections * Hack the Hood * iFoster * Law Foundation of Silicon Valley * Learning Alliance * Legal Assistance for Seniors * Legal Services for Children * National Youth Employment Coalition * New Haven Tennis Outreach * OneJustice * Paws in Need * Pinellas Education Foundation * Pleasanton Partnerships in Education * Silicon Valley Children’s Fund * Silicon Valley Leadership Group Foundation * Tahoe-Pyramid Bikeway * TeenForce * Thinkof -Us * Silicon Valley Children’s Fund * SOAR * University of California Merced * Wounded Warrior Project.

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    Grantee Reporting Requirements

    Interim Reports

    Multi-year grantees must submit interim reports for every year of the grant life-cycle, and a final report at the end of the grant cycle. Interim reports are due three months prior to the yearly anniversary. Reporting dates will be included in the grant contract. In addition to the narrative report, please submit an update on accomplishments to date on the current year’s accountability plan and a revised accountability plan for the upcoming grant year.

    Single-year grantees who are considering applying for renewal funding should contact program staff six months prior to the end of the present grant-term. If invited to re-apply, a report on progress toward the present grant year’s goals, objectives, accountability plan, and spending should be submitted with the new proposal application.

    Final Reports

    All grantees are required to submit final reports, which are due two months after the end of the grant period, unless otherwise specified. For multi-year grants, the final report is a cumulative, comprehensive examination of the entire grant term.

    Please note that the Foundation typically provides no more than two or three years of consecutive funding.

    Since all reports have been revised recently, grantees should contact Charles “Chuck” Hoblitzelle, Grants Manager for current forms and instructions. chuckhoblitzelle(at)wsjf.org

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    How do I apply for a Grant?

    Step 1) Determine your eligibility

    We support organizations whose work qualifies as charitable, according to the IRS definition. This includes organizations with a 501(c) 3 status, public agencies, and projects sponsored by public charities. Only organizations serving the WSJF’s targeted regions of Northern California and Nevada are eligible for grants. We do not make grants to individuals, towards arts or film projects, or contribute to capital campaigns. We do not make grants to international organizations. For county chapters of state organizations, proposal invitations are generally only offered to the state organization.

    Step 2) Determine your project’s fit

    Review our funding priorities and list of previous grants to determine whether your efforts advance one or more of the Foundation’s goals and objectives. If you determine that your project/program aligns well with our strategy, please proceed to Step 3. Please review our Funding Priorities .

    Step 3) Contact Us

    If you have determined that your project is eligible and it is a fit for The WSJF funding priorities, please contact our Program Director: Yali Lincroft ([email protected]) to see whether you should submit a proposal. Often, a Letter of Inquiry is requested prior to a full proposal submission. The Walter S. Johnson Foundation does not accept unsolicited proposals.

    Step 4) Submit a proposal (by invitation only)

    If you have been invited to submit a proposal, a WSJF Program Officer or Grants Manager will send a proposal packet electronically. Please submit your application by the deadline that you have been given (typically several months prior to the board meeting at which your proposal will be considered). The proposal application packet consists of instructions, a checklist of required documents, and the foundation’s expectations with respect to the proposal. When completed, submit proposal and attachments electronically to our Program Director: Yali Lincroft ([email protected]

    Please note, it can take approximately 3 to 6 months for program staff to conduct the necessary due diligence (which may include but not be limited to a site visit, follow-up meetings with key staff, reference checks, and program/financial assessment) to present funding recommendations to our Board of Trustees. During the review process, staff will keep you informed about your proposal’s status.

    Step 5) Proposal review and funding determination

    Program staff will notify you if and when your proposal will be presented to the Board of Directors and when to expect a decision. The Board meets four times each year to make funding decisions (February, May, July/August, and November). Proposals are generally due 3 months prior to the board meeting.

    Please note that the Foundation typically provides no more than two or three years of consecutive funding to its grantees.

    Media

    • News from the field and from grantees
      • Homeless youths face struggles in Shasta county (Redding Record Searchlight, 1/4/21)
      • East Bay urban farm helps foster youths find purpose, community (East Bay Times, 1/8/21)
      • Seneca Family of Agencies is helping immigrants separated from their families by ICE deal with mental trauma (AZ Central, 1/15/21)
      • New initiative supports NV foster youth aging out of care (Public News Service, 1/28/21)
      • A new study highlights promising jobs programs for foster youth (Imprint, 2/2/21)
      • California foster parents win vaccine eligibility, as fight continues in New York (Imprint, 3/16/21)
      • Top Trump child welfare official and former foster youth will host COVID-19 town hall (Imprint, 3/18/21)
      • The lost year: How the pandemic changed a generation of students (Time, 4/12/21)
      • Young adults from foster care system need COVID relief funds now (Santa Monica Observer, 5/1/21)
    • News from the field and from grantees

      • Fostering conversation: Spanning the digital divide  (Resolve Magazine, 4/22/20)
      • The risk of hidden foster care during COVID19 (ABA, 6/1/20)
      • Coronavirus Relief: for us, this is personal.  The need for national assistance to older youth in care right now (Impact, 11/29/20)
      • COVID 19 strips safety net for foster youth aging out during pandemic (MedPage Today, 12/8/20)
      • Youth homeless and higher education – an overview” (SchoolHouse Connections, Jan 2019)
      • “Food insecurity – better information could help students access federal food assistance benefits” (US Government Accountability Office, Jan 2019)
      • “Lessons in Disaster Recovery from the Napa Valley Wildfires” (VOICES/On The Move, Jan 2019)
      • “Op Ed – School funding ignores growing need of homeless students in rural California” (San Francisco Chronicle, Jan 2019)
      • “Crisis on the Coast – The Bay Coastal Foster Youth and Homeless Student Population” (Pivot Learning, Feb 2019)
      • “Homeless youth handbook – Helping homeless youth understand their legal rights” (Baker McKenzie, Feb 2019)
      • “Roadmap to college” (Opportunity Junction, Feb 2019)
      • “Supporting college transition for homeless youth – Online training for school staff ” (John Burton Advocates for Youth, Feb 2019)
      • “California legislation eases access to financial aid for foster students”(Youth Today, Feb 2019)
      • “Foster youth, careworkers diverge in views of youths’ preparedness for college” (Chapin Hall, March 2019)
      • “Welcome to college career advocacy leadership, Inc.” (Cali website, April 2019)
      • “Child welfare emergency fund” (Children Now, April 2019)
      • “SSi trust – advocacy fact sheet” (Bay Area Legal Aid, April 2019)
      • “Help 33,000 CA foster youth get the technology they need to thrive !” (iFoster, April 2019)
      • “A $22 million plan to connect California foster youth to smart phones” (Chronicle of Social Change, April 2019)
      • “iFoster teams up to provide California foster youth with smart phones” (iFoster blog, April 2019)
      • “California approves free phones, internet for foster youth” (US News and World Report, April 2019)
      • “Foster kids to get free smartphones starting in June” (89.3KPCC, April 2019)
      • “Youth in foster care to get smartphones , internet access in pilot program” (USA Today, April 2019)
      • “California foster youth in extended care have better postsecondary outcomes” (Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, May 2019)
      • “Story of my life” (FosterMore, June 2019)
      • “The California Children’s Trust Initiative: Financing new approaches to achieve child well-being” (California Children’s Trust, July 2019)
      • “Former South Bay foster child pays it forward as family court judge” (The Mercury News, June 2, 2019)
      • “Graduating from college still a struggle for many California foster youth” (EdSource, July 1, 2019)
      • “Understanding trauma to promote healing in child welfare” (California Child Welfare Co Investment Partnership, Summer 2019)
      • “California community colleges work to solve housing for foster youth (EdSource, Sept 12, 2019)
      • YouTube Video – The FAFSA challenge (John Burton Advocates for Youth, Jan 12, 2018)
      • “Bill will give foster youth greater access to Cal Grant financing” (Daily Republic – Solano County News Source, Jan 2018)
      • “Three strategies that helped San Francisco increase foster home application by 300%” (Chronicle for Social Change, Jan 2018)
      • “Rural county leaders fund 1,100 computers for foster youth in 35 counties” (CISION PR Web, Jan 29, 2018
      • “College aid a game changer for foster youth, but many don’t apply” (KPCC, Feb 19, 2019)
      • “Lights, Camera, Juma!” (NBC Asian Pacific America, Jan 2018)
      • “Bill to tackle student homelessness at CSU” (YourCentralValley.com, Feb 2018)
      • “CSU conference at Sac State highlights housing, food insecurity” (The State Hornet, Feb 2018)
      • “A court companion to the foster youth education toolkit” (Alliance for Children’s Rights, Mar 2018)
      • “Remove financial aid roadblocks to open college doors for California’s foster youth” (Sacramento Bee, Mar 2018)
      • “Equipped for success: Laptop donation supports more than 70 local foster youth” (Chico News & Review, May 2018)
      • “National foster care month kicks off with distribution of laptops for foster youth” (Representing California’s Rural Counties, May 2018)
      • “Foster youth in College” (Inside California Education, May 2018)
      • “Older foster youth would be challenged by proposed work requirements for food stamps” (Chronicle of Social Change, June 2018)
      • “California College Pathways foster youth program awarded the 2018 HUD secretary’s award for public-philanthropic partnerships” (California Community Colleges Chancellor’s Office, July 2018)
      • “Somewhere to turn- Meeting the mental health needs of adoptive and guardianship families” (Sierra Health Foundation, July 2018)
      • “California advocates receive federal award for helping foster youth succeed in college” (Chronicle of Social Change, July 2018)
      • “Beyond the safety net: Case management check in guide” (John Burton Advocates for Youth, Aug 2018)
      • “Building a safety net for the safety net: Legal aid partnership with youth” (Bay Area Legal Aid, Aug 2018)
      • “Nevada foster youth granted college tuition waiver” (Las Vegas Review, Sept 2018)
      • “2017-2018 THP+FC & THP Plus Annual Report” (John Burton Advocates for Youth, Oct 2018)
      • “California College Pathways Progress Update Report” (John Burton Advocates for Youth, Oct 2018)
      • “Contra Costa CalFresh ABAWD Discovery Report Oct 2018” (Contra Costa Solano Food Bank, Oct 2018)
      • “Nevada board of regents approves foster youth tuition and fee waiver policy” (Nevada Business Magazine, Oct 2018)
      • “The dollars and sense of becoming a Medi-Cal contracted organization ” (First Place for Youth, Nov 2018)
      • “Walter S Johnson Foundation receives the 2018 Bernard Osher Philanthropist of the Year Award” (Foundation for California Community Colleges, Nov 2018)
      • “After the fire burns down their home, one California foster family stays together” (Chronicle of Social Change, Nov 2018)
      • The James Irvine Foundation Leadership Awards recognize Californians who are advancing innovative solutions to critical issues facing our state. WSJF former and current grantee – Julia Wilson, OneJustice and Ken Berrick, Senecca Families of Agencies – won this year’s award (Jan 2017).
      • Selected from a pool of 15,000, Sixto Cancel, founder of ThinkofUs rec’d the “30 Under 30” award from Forbes (Jan 2017)
      • Exploited, Abused Bay Area Youth Find Security at Dreamcatcher Youth Center in Oakland (ABC & Stars, Jan 25, 2017)
      • Fix School Discipline – A Toolkit for Educators (Public Counsel, Feb 2017)
      • A new website called FosteringQualityEducation.org helps foster youth evaluate a college, with warnings on risks often associated with for-profit colleges. There is a user-friendly video and links to websites with further assistance (Children’s Advocacy Institute, Jan 2017).
      • Foster Kids Headed to Poverty, Pregnancy, and Prison Unless We Help (San Jose Mercury News Op Ed, Feb 11, 2017).
      • The Resource Family Approval Toolkit helps walk caregivers throughCalifornia’s newly implemented Resource Family Approval process (Alliance for Children’s Rights & the Step Up Coalition, Feb 2017).
      • Presentation to the California Child Welfare Council on the CalYOUTH Outcomes through Age 19 Study (University of Chicago, March 2017).
      • Memo from CalYOUTH: Early Findings on the Relationships between Extended Foster Care and Youths’ Outcomes at Age 19 (University of Chicago, March 2017)
      • Memo from CalYOUTH: Factors Associated with Youth Remaining in Foster Care as Young Adult (University of Chicago, April 2017)
      • Findings from CalYOUTH: Conditions of Youth at Age 19, Los Angeles County Report (University of Chicago, May 2017)
      • Memo from CalYOUTH: Predictors of High School Completion and College Entry at Ages 19/20 (University of Chicago, Aug 2017)
      • Memo from CalYOUTH: The Use of Psychotropic Medications over Time among Foster Youth Transitioning to Adulthood (University of Chicago, Dec 2017)
      • FosterMore “Story of Our Lives” wins Cynopsis Social Good Award for best social media ad (FosterMore, Mar 2017).
      • Video Highlights from the Silicon Valley HackFosterCare event (HackFosterCare, Mar, 2017).
      • Engaging Legal Services in Community Efforts to Prevent and End Homelessness (US Interagency Council on Homelessness, Feb 2017).
      • Attorneys: More Funding Needed to Help East Bay Children’s Law Office (East Bay Times, Mar, 2017)
      • Resources Supporting Homeless Students at California’s Public Universities and Colleges (California Homeless Youth Project, Apr 2017)
      • The Renaissance Scholar – CSU East Bay (Video, Apr 2017)
      • Grandfamilies.org – a national legal resource in support of grandfamilies within and outside the child welfare system (June 2017)
      • Interview with ThinkofUs Founder Sixto Cancel – “Foster-Care Veteran Seeks to Use Tech to Ease Transition to Adult Life” (Chronicle of Philanthropy, July 2017)
      • “One LaptopPer Foster Youth” promotional video (iFoster, 2017)
      • “Washoe County Helping Foster Youth Showing Results” (Kolo8News, June 2017)
      • “Guardian Scholars Program Provides Support for Former Foster Youth” (CSU Monterey Bay News, Aug 2017)
      • “Foster Youth Informed Education Project” (Civicorps, Sept 2017)
      • “Stepping Up for Foster Youth: A Policy Playbook for California’s Four Year Universities” (John Burton Advocates for Youth, Sept 21, 2017)
      • “Tanoshi partners with iFoster to donate new, educational and age-appropriate computers to foster youth” (PR Web, Sept 27, 2017)
      • “Validation of the CSE-IT” (WestCoast Children’s Clinic, Sept 2017)
      • “Video Profiles Community College Students Enrolled in Fresh Success Program” (Foundation for California Community Colleges, Oct 2017)
      • “From Foster Care to Motherhood – A Radio Diary” (KALW, Oct 2, 2017) and “Promotional Video” (First Place for Youth, Oct 2017)
      • “Youth Radio Win Third Coast Award” (Youth Radio Press Release, Oct 18, 2017)
      • “Accelerating Success: Turning Insights into Action for Foster Youth at California Community Colleges” (John Burton Advocates for Youth, Oct 16, 2017)
      • “From Interns to Influencer: Foster Youth Internship Program a Growing Force on Federal Policy” (Chronicle of Social Change, Oct 18, 2017)
      • “In California Wine Country, Child Welfare Responds to Wild Fire” (Chronicle of Social Change, Nov 22, 2017)
      • “Summer Scholars” (Epicenter/UC Merced, Nov 30, 2017)
      • “These States are Helping Former Foster Youth Navigate College” (PBS News Hour, Dec 7, 2017)
      • “For Foster Care Kids, College Degrees are Elusive,” (HuffPost, Dec 7, 2017)
      • “Yolo County and Woodland Community College Partner to Create a Safe Space for Youth” (Woodland Daily Democrats, Dec 7, 2017)
      • “Building A Pathway to Resilience For Foster Youth Through Social Capital” (Chronicle of Social Change, Dec 11, 2017)
      • “In California, A Push to Help More Foster Youth Get Financial Aid” (Chronicle of Social Change, Dec 19, 2017)
      • “Balancing Head and Heart: California’s Child Welfare Workforce” (California Child Welfare Co Investment Partnership, Dec 19, 2017)
      • The Walter S. Johnson Foundation is part of the Youth Transitional Funders Group, a national network of funders that work together to support the well-being and economic success of vulnerable young people age 14 to 25. “The Well-Being Journey for Youth in Foster Care ” (Feb 2016) is a video developed by the Foster Care Work Group of the Youth Transition Funders Group
      • The Walter S. Johnson Foundation is part of the California Child Welfare Co-Investment Partnership, a collaboration of private and public organizations working to improve outcomes in the child welfare system. “Crossover Youth: A Shared Responsibility” (Insights, Volume X) offers an overview of data, policy and reform efforts that seek to better understand youth in the child welfare and juvenile justice system in California (Feb 2016).
      • California College Pathways published a new two year study, Charting the Course: Using Data to Support Foster Youth College Success. This report offers insights into the educational experiences of foster youth attending community colleges and universities throughout the state by providing information on a common set of academic progress and outcome measures. A one-page overview of key findings and policy and practice implications is available here (Feb 2016).
      • “Access to Justice: Q&A with our Legal Services Funder Network” – WSJF Program Officer Yali Lincroft is interviewed by Northern California Grantmakers regarding her role as steering committee member for the Legal Services Funders Network (March 2016).
      • Fresh Success is the new CalFresh Employment and Training Model, implemented in Spring 2016. The Foundation for California Community College is partnering with the California Department of Social Services to help CalFresh recipients in community colleges and community-based organizations gain skills and employment.
      • Yali Lincroft, Program Officer for the Walter S. Johnson Foundation attended the ninth annual Clinton Global Initiative hosted at UC Berkeley, CA. The Chronicle of Social Change published her piece on the experience (April 4, 2016).
      • “Failing Grade: How California’s School Districts Have Abandoned Children with Disabilities” (Western Center on Law & Poverty, April 2016). This new report details how 580,000 children with mental disabilities have been left without help and have, in some cases, been sent to juvenile hall, rather than getting the school based mental health services to which they are legally entitled. This failure is particularly egregious in light of the massive state payments to local school districts that supposedly paid for the services.
      • Raley’s Marks 1st Anniversary of Hiring Foster Youth (Progressive Grocer, May 2016).
      • VOICES Sonoma County announces “Changing the Story: Recommendations to Improve Services for Transition Age Foster Youth in Sonoma County” (May 2016).
      • Findings from the California Youth Transitions to Adulthood Study (CalYOUTH): Conditions of Youth at Age 19 (May 2016).
      • UC Berkeley researcher Dr. Jill Duerr Berrick studies select California counties prior to the implementation of the “Approved Relative Care Funding Options Program” (ARC) to understand the caregiver characteristics and the characteristics of the children in their care in this report (May 2016).
      • Echoing Green Fellow Serita Cox, Leverages the Internet of Things to Innovate the Child Welfare System (Huffington Post, June 2016).
      • Final Report on Fresno and Santa Clara Counties Efforts to Improve Outcomes for Latino Youth and LGBTQ Youth (Center for the Study of Social Policy, Summer 2016)
      • Special Immigrant Juvenile Justice – Guidance for Practitioners (Center for the Study of Social Policy, July 2016)
      • The California Child Welfare Co-Investment Partnership‘s latest issue of insights Volume XI, On Balance: The Courts & Child Welfare. (Fall 2016).
      • This issue of insights examines the juvenile court’s role in the child welfare system and provides recommendations on how to best meet the complex needs of children and families in child welfare.
      • Transitional Age Foster Youth – Getting Them Into and Through College (Central Valley Higher Education Consortium, Fall 2016). This report describes the barriers that foster youth in the Central Valley region of California face in attending college and makes recommendations for college policies and programs to remove those barriers.
      • iFoster Announces Employer Tax Bill for Foster Youth (Yahoo News, Sept 2016). iFoster (www.ifoster.org) announced today that H.R.5947, the “Improved Employment Outcomes For Foster Youth Act of 2016” was introduced in Congress. This bill amends the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to include transition age foster youth as categorically eligible for purposes of the Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC). Employers may be eligible to receive a credit of up to $2,400 annually for each foster youth hired.
      • Practices with Promise – The Guardian Scholars Program at Skyline College (Campaign for College Opportunity, Oct 2016).
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    We make every effort to get back to email inquiries in a timely fashion, however due to the large number of emails received, we may be unable to quickly respond directly to your inquiry.  Solicitation requests are not responded to so please avoid emailing us sales requests.  We are located at 505 Montgomery Street, Suite 1200 | San Francisco, CA 94111-6529. To reach us via phone please call 415-283-1854.  Our fax number is 415-283-1840